IMPORTANT NOTICE: Due to medical reasons, please expect sporadic delays in all correspondence & services (including processing of posts) over the next few months. We apologize for any inconvenience and thank you for any prayers.


Please Bookmark This Site, Link To Us & Tell Your Friends!

My Catholic Source.com Christ the King of All Nations My Catholic Source.com My Catholic Source.com

My Catholic Source.com Home

Help

Join E-Mail List

Support This Site

Bookmark Site

Tell a Friend

Link to Us

FAQs

Feedback

By Using This Site, You Agree To All Terms

Search

 

Reflections: Catholic Fun & Activities Sectn.

Mother with Children

Fun & Act. | Home | Daily Digest | Reflctns.: A-Z | Categorized

Reflections: 

 Catholic Fun & Activities Section

Wisdom of the Popes, Saints, Theologians, Other...

Important Notice: We make no guarantees regarding any item herein. Use of site is subject to our terms of use. By using this site you indicate agreement to all terms. For more terms information, see below and click here.


Click link below or scroll down to view all...

Balls / Dances

Catholics Should Prefer to Associate with Catholics

Cinema / Motion Pictures

Comics / Illustrated Stories

Entertainment Need Not Lack Cultural Validity

Excessive Play

Frivolous Amusement / Precept of Charity

Legion of Decency

Motion Pictures & Radio: Duties

Motion Pictures & Television: Educating / Training Spectators

Motion Pictures / Cinema, Television, and Radio

Motion Pictures / Radio / Television

Parents, Youths, and Entertainment

Play / Pleasure / Relaxation

Public Amusement / Feast Days

Radio

Run From Places of Sin

Television

Travelers as Heralds of Christ

Misc. 

Also Try...

 

Category
Quotation

"Although balls and dancing be recreations in their own nature indifferent, yet, according to the ordinary manner in which they are conducted, they preponderate very much on the side of evil, and are, in consequence, extremely dangerous. Being generally carried on in the darkness and obscurity of night, it is by no means surprising that several vicious circumstances should obtain easy admittance, since the subject is of itself so susceptible of evil. The [participants] of these diversions, by sitting up late at night, disable themselves from discharging their duty to God on the morning of the day following. Is it not, then, a kind of madness to exchange the day for the night, light for darkness, and good works for criminal fooleries? Every one strives who shall carry most vanity to the ball; and vanity is so congenial to evil affections as well as to dangerous familiarities that both are easily engendered by dancing. Balls, dancing, and other nocturnal meetings ordinarily attract the reigning vices and sins together, namely, quarrels, envy, scoffing; and wanton loves; and as these exercises open the pores of the bodies of those that use them, so they also open the pores of their hearts, and expose them to the danger of some serpent taking the advantage to breathe loose words or lascivious suggestions into the ear, or of a basilisk casting an impure look or wanton glance of love into the heart, which, being thus opened, is easily seized upon and poisoned. These idle recreations are ordinarily very dangerous; they chase away the spirit of devotion, and leave the soul in a languishing condition; they cool the fervor of charity, and excite a thousand evil affections in the soul, and therefore they are not to be used but with the greatest caution...and I say, that after dancing it is necessary to refresh our souls with good and holy considerations, to prevent the baneful effects of these dangerous impressions, which the vain pleasure taken in dancing may have left in our minds. But what considerations? 1. Consider that during the time you were at the ball innumerable souls were burning in the flames of hell, for the sins they had committed in dancing, or were occasioned by their dances. 2. That many religious and devout persons, of both sexes, were at that very time in the presence of God, singing His praises and contemplating His beauty. Ah! how much more profitably was their time employed than yours! 3. That whilst you were dancing many souls departed out of this world in great anguish, and that thousands of thousands of men and women then suffered great pains in their beds, in hospitals, in the streets, by the gout, the stone, or burning fevers. Alas! they had no rest, and will you have no compassion for them? And do you not think that you shall one day groan as they did, whilst others shall dance as you did? 4. That our Blessed Savior, His Virgin Mother, the Angels and Saints, beheld you at the ball. Ah! how greatly did they pity you, seeing your heart pleased with so vain an amusement, and taken up with such childish toys! 5. Alas! whilst you were there, Time was passing away, and Death was approaching nearer: behold how he mocks you, and invites you to his dance, in which the groans of your friends shall serve for the music, and where you shall make but one step from this life to the next. The dance of death is, alas the true pastime of mortals, since by it we instantly pass from the vain amusements of this world to the eternal pains or pleasures of the next. I have set you down these little considerations. God will suggest to you many more to the like effect, provided you fear Him." (St. Francis De Sales, Doctor of the Church)

"From this point of view one cannot sufficiently deplore the blindness of so many women of every age and condition; made foolish by desire to please, they do not see to what a degree the indecency of their clothing shocks every honest man, and offends God. Most of them would formerly have blushed for those toilettes as for a grave fault against Christian modesty; now it does not suffice for them to exhibit them on the public thoroughfares; they do not fear to cross the threshold of the churches, to assist at the Holy sacrifice of the Mass, and even to bear the seducing food of shameful passions to the Eucharistic Table where one receives the heavenly Author of purity. And We speak not of those exotic and barbarous dances recently imported into fashionable circles, one more shocking than the other; one cannot imagine anything more suitable for banishing all the remains of modesty." (Pope Benedict XV, "Sacra Propediem", 1921)

Also See: Run From Places of Sin

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"Nay, rather, unless forced by necessity to do otherwise, Catholics ought to prefer to associate with Catholics, a course which will be very conducive to the safeguarding of their faith." (Pope Leo XIII, "Longinqua", 1895)

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"Comics and illustrated stories are not to be despised. They can for instance be used to illustrate the Sacred Scriptures and the lives of the saints. All these productions of the printing press deserve our interest and support." (Pope Paul VI)

Also See: Catholic Book Review & Exchange (Reflections)

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"It should be recalled that many great works recognized as the products of genius, particularly in music, drama and literature, were first presented to the public as entertainment. So entertainment need not lack cultural validity." (Pope Paul VI)

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"Excessive play pertains to senseless mirth, which Gregory (Moralium xxxi,17) calls a daughter of gluttony." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"A gloss on Proverbs 14:13, 'Laughter shall be mingled with sorrow and mourning taketh hold of the end of joy,' remarks: 'A mourning that will last for ever.' Now there is inordinate laughter and inordinate joy in excessive play. Therefore there is mortal sin therein, since mortal sin alone is deserving of everlasting mourning...In all things dirigible according to reason, the excessive is that which goes beyond, and the deficient is that which falls short of the rule of reason. Now it has been stated that playful or jesting words or deeds are dirigible according to reason. Wherefore excessive play is that which goes beyond the rule of reason: and this happens in two ways. First, on account of the very species of the acts employed for the purpose of fun, and this kind of jesting, according to Tully (De Officiis i,29), is stated to be 'discourteous, insolent, scandalous, and obscene,' when to wit a man, for the purpose of jesting, employs indecent words or deeds, or such as are injurious to his neighbor, these being of themselves mortal sins. And thus it is evident that excessive play is a mortal sin. Secondly, there may be excess in play, through lack of due circumstances: for instance when people make use of fun at undue times or places, or out of keeping with the matter in hand, or persons. This may be sometimes a mortal sin on account of the strong attachment to play, when a man prefers the pleasure he derives therefrom to the love of God, so as to be willing to disobey a commandment of God or of the Church rather than forego, such like amusements. Sometimes, however, it is a venial sin, for instance where a man is not so attached to amusement as to be willing for its sake to do anything in disobedience to God." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

Also See: Play / Pleasure / Relaxation

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"But when on the one hand We see thousands of the needy, victims of real misery for various reasons beyond their control, and on the other so many round about them who spend huge sums of money on useless things and frivolous amusement, We cannot fail to remark with sorrow not only that justice is poorly observed, but that the precept of charity also is not sufficiently appreciated, is not a vital thing in daily life. We desire therefore, Venerable Brethren, that this divine precept, this precious mark of identification left by Christ to His true disciples, be ever more fully explained by pen and word of mouth; this precept which teaches us to see in those who suffer Christ Himself, and would have us love our brothers as Our Divine Savior has loved us, that is, even at the sacrifice of ourselves, and, if need be, of our very life. Let all then frequently meditate on those words of the final sentence, so consoling yet so terrifying, which the Supreme Judge will pronounce on the day of the Last Judgment: 'Come, ye blessed of my Father ... for I was hungry and you gave me to eat; I was thirsty and you gave me to drink ... Amen, I say to you, as long as you did it to one of these my least brethren you did it to me.' And the reverse: 'Depart from me, you cursed, into everlasting fire ... for I was hungry and you gave me not to eat; I was thirsty and you gave me not to drink ... Amen, I say to you, as long as you did it not to one of these least. neither did you do it to me.'" (Pope Pius XI, "Divini Redemptoris", 1937)

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

Motion Pictures / Cinema, Television, and Radio 

Click here for 'Reflections' related to this topic, including:

Cinema / Motion Pictures

Legion of Decency

Motion Pictures & Radio: Duties

Motion Pictures & Television: Educating / Training Spectators

Motion Pictures / Radio / Television

Radio

Television

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"Special measures should be taken to protect adolescents from publications and entertainments harmful to them." (Second Vatican Council)

"Parents on their part should remember that it is their duty to see that entertainments and publications which might endanger faith and morals do not enter their houses and that their children are not exposed to them elsewhere." (Second Vatican Council)

"It is no less necessary to direct and watch the education of the adolescent, 'soft as wax to be moulded into vice,' in whatever other environment he may happen to be, removing occasions of evil and providing occasions for good in his recreations and social intercourse; for 'evil communications corrupt good manners.'" (Pope Pius XI, "Divini Illius Magistri", 1929)

"It is never too early to start encouraging in children artistic taste, a keen critical faculty and a sense of personal responsibility that is based on sound morality. They need all these so that they can use discrimination in choosing from the publications, films and broadcasts that are set before them. This is necessary because the young are naturally vulnerable, but this self-discipline acquired in childhood will richly serve the adult too. Generosity and idealism are admirable qualities in young people, so are their frankness and sincerity. But these qualities, along with self-discipline, will only survive if they are guarded and fostered from an early age." (Pope Paul VI)

"Further, the motion picture has enlisted in its service luxurious appointments, pleasing music, the vigor of realism, every form of whim and fancy. For this very reason, it attracts and fascinates particularly the young, the adolescent, and even the child. Thus at the very age when the moral sense is being formed and when the notions and sentiments of justice and rectitude, of duty and obligation and of ideals of life are being developed, the motion picture with its direct propaganda assumes a position of commanding influence. It is unfortunate that, in the present state of affairs, this influence is frequently exerted for evil. So much so that when one thinks of the havoc wrought in the souls of youth and of childhood, of the loss of innocence so often suffered in the motion picture theatres, there comes to mind the terrible condemnation pronounced by Our Lord upon the corrupters of little ones: 'whosoever shall scandalize one of these little ones who believe in Me, it were better for him that a millstone be hanged about his neck and that he be drowned in the depths of the sea'." (Pope Pius XI, "Vigilanti Cura", 1936)

"But if that saying, 'a little leaven corrupteth the whole mass' corresponds at all to the truth, and if physical growth in youths can be prevented, by some infectious germ, from reaching full maturity, much more can some base element of education steal its way into the fibres of the religious life, and check the due shaping of morals. Everyone knows well that, very often, children can avoid the transient attack of a disease outside their own home, but cannot escape it when it lurks within the home itself. It is wrong to introduce risk in any form into the sanctity of home surroundings; the Church, therefore, as her right and duty demand, has always striven with all her force to prevent these sacred portals suffering violence, under any pretext, from evil television shows." (Pope Pius XII, "Miranda Prorsus", 1957)

"More than ever nowadays an extended and careful vigilance is necessary, inasmuch as the dangers of moral and religious shipwreck are greater for inexperienced youth. Especially is this true of impious and immoral books, often diabolically circulated at low prices; of the cinema, which multiplies every kind of exhibition; and now also of the radio, which facilitates every kind of communications. These most powerful means of publicity, which can be of great utility for instruction and education when directed by sound principles, are only too often used as an incentive to evil passions and greed for gain. St. Augustine deplored the passion for the shows of the circus which possessed even some Christians of his time, and he dramatically narrates the infatuation for them, fortunately only temporary, of his disciple and friend Alipius. How often today must parents and educators bewail the corruption of youth brought about by the modern theater and the vile book!" (Pope Pius XI, "Divini Illius Magistri", 1929)

"Thus, besides being discriminating television viewers themselves, parents should actively help to form in their children viewing habits conducive to sound development, human, moral and religious. Parents should inform themselves in advance about program content and make a conscious choice on that basis for the good of the family - to watch or not to watch. Reviews and evaluations provided by religious agencies and other responsible groups - together with sound media education programs - can be helpful in this regard. Parents should also discuss television with their children, guiding them to regulate the amount and quality of their viewing, and to perceive and judge the ethical values underlying particular programs... Forming children's viewing habits will sometimes mean simply turning off the television set: because there are better things to do, because consideration for other family members requires it, or because indiscriminate television viewing can be harmful. Parents who make regular, prolonged use of television as a kind of electronic babysitter surrender their role as the primary educators of their children. Such dependence on television can deprive family members of opportunities to interact with one another through conversation, shared activities and common prayer. Wise parents are also aware that even good programs should be supplemented by other sources of news, entertainment, education and culture." (Pope John Paul II)

"Yet it must be noticed that, in exercising control in this matter, the right training and education of the spectators, of which We have spoken, is not in itself sufficient. Each of the shows must be suited and adapted to the degree of intelligence of each age, the strength of their emotional and imaginative response, and the condition of their morals. This, indeed, assumes a very great importance because sound radio and television shows, since they easily penetrate right into the domestic circle, threaten to undermine the protective barriers by which the education of the young must be kept safe and sound until such time as advancing age gives the necessary strength to enable them to overcome the buffetings of the world. For this reason, three years ago, We wrote thus to the Bishops of Italy: 'Should we not shudder if we reflect attentively that by means of television shows, even within home surroundings all can inhale that poisoned air of 'materialistic' doctrines which diffuse notions of empty pleasures and desires of all kinds, in the same way as they did over and over again in cinema halls?' We are aware of the initiatives which have been encouraged not only by public authorities but also by private groups who are engaged in the education of youth; We mean those undertakings and plans by which they make every possible effort to withdraw young people from those shows which are unsuited to their age, though they are too often being attended, with resulting serious harm. Whatever is being done in this praiseworthy cause, We heartily approve; yet it must be noticed that, even more than the physiological and psychological disturbances which can arise therefrom, those dangers must be guarded against which affect the morals of youth, and which, unless turned aside and forbidden in due season, can greatly contribute to the damage and overthrow of human society itself. Concerning this matter, We make a father's appeal to the young so dear to Us, trusting that - since it is a question of entertainment in which their innocence can be exposed to danger - they will be outstanding for their Christian restraint and prudence. It is their grave obligation to check and control that natural and unrestrained eagerness to see and hear anything; and they must keep their mind free from immodest and earthly pleasures and direct it to higher things." (Pope Pius XII, "Miranda Prorsus", 1957)

"In addition, it is essential that producers of television films take care not only to preserve intact religious and honorable principles, but also to be on special guard against the danger which the young may perhaps fall into, if they are present at shows intended for grown-ups. With regard to similar performances which are put on in cinemas and theatres, in order to preserve the common good, appropriate precautions have been deliberately taken in almost all civilized countries, with the object of keeping young people away from immoral entertainments. But it is common knowledge that television - and with greater reason - needs the benefits and safeguards of alert vigilance. It is praiseworthy that, in some countries, items forbidden to the young are excluded from the television programs; but if it happens that certain places admit such, then, at least, definite precautions are absolutely essential. It is useless for anyone to suppose that excellent principles and an upright conscience on the part of those engaged in these arts are sufficient either to ensure that nothing but good flows from the small white screen, or to remove all that is evil. In this matter, then, prudence and watchful care are especially demanded of those who make use of television. Due moderation in its use, prudence in admitting the children to viewing according to their different ages, a balanced judgment based on what has been seen before, and finally, exclusion of children from what are in any sense improper spectacles: all these are the duties which weigh heavily on parents and on all engaged in education. We do not overlook the fact that the directives We have just given in the last section, can sometimes produce serious difficulties and considerable inconveniences; for the awareness of their role as educators will often demand that parents give clear example to their offspring, and also bid them deny themselves - not without some personal sacrifice - some programs they would like to see. But who thinks the burden on parents is too heavy when the supreme good of the children is at stake? This being so, - as We declared in a letter to the Italian Bishops - 'it is a most pressing need that the conscience of Catholics with regard to television should be formed by the sound principles of the Christian religion'; the more so, in order that this kind of art may not be at the service of error or the snares of vice, but may prove to be rather a help 'to educate and train men, and recall them to their higher state'." (Pope Pius XII, "Miranda Prorsus", 1957)

Also See: Motion Pictures & Radio: Duties | Motion Pictures & Television: Educating / Training Spectators | Catholic Life Section (Reflections)

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"[P]lay is necessary for the intercourse of human life." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"The temperate man does not shun all pleasures, but those that are immoderate, and contrary to reason." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"Have no joy in the pleasures of a moment which bring on poverty redoubled" (Sirach 18:32)

" As for the seed that fell among thorns, they are the ones who have heard, but as they go along, they are choked by the anxieties and riches and pleasures of life, and they fail to produce mature fruit." (Our Lord Jesus Christ, Lk. 8:14)

"Thought it is lawful to play games, to dance, to adorn oneself, to be present at proper plays, and to feast, yet to have an affection to such things is contrary to devotion, and extremely hurtful and dangerous." (St. Francis de Sales, Doctor of the Church)

"All things seek pleasure in the same way as they seek good: since pleasure is the repose of the appetite in good. But, just as it happens that not every good which is desired, is of itself and verily good; so not every pleasure is of itself and verily good." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"[It] is evident that good which is fitting to the body, and which causes bodily delight through being apprehended by sense, is not man's perfect good, but is quite a trifle as compared with the good of the soul. Hence it is written (Wisdom 7:9) that 'all gold in comparison of her, is as a little sand.' And therefore bodily pleasure is neither happiness itself, nor a proper accident of happiness." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"The second reason can be found by considering the actions, some of which are good, some evil. Now pleasures which are conjoined to actions are more akin to those actions, than desires, which precede them in point of time. Wherefore, since the desires of good actions are good, and of evil actions, evil; much more are the pleasures of good actions good, and those of evil actions evil." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"[St.] Augustine says (De Musica ii,15): 'I pray thee, spare thyself at times: for it becomes a wise man sometimes to relax the high pressure of his attention to work.' Now this relaxation of the mind from work consists in playful words or deeds. Therefore it becomes a wise and virtuous man to have recourse to such things at times. Moreover the Philosopher (Ethica Nicomachea ii,7;iv,8) assigns to games the virtue of the Greek, which we may call pleasantness." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"Recreation, in its manifold varieties, has become a necessity for people who work under the fatiguing conditions of modern industry, but it must be worthy of the rational nature of man and therefore must be morally healthy. It must be elevated to the rank of a positive factor for good and must seek to arouse noble sentiments. A people who, in time of repose, give themselves to diversions which violate decency, honor, or morality, to recreations which, especially to the young, constitute occasions of sin, are in grave danger of losing their greatness and even their national power." (Pope Pius XI, "Vigilanti Cura", 1936)

"Today, through the media, the noblest forms of artistic expression offer true recreation - in the fullest sense of that word - to more and more people. And there is more and more call for this in our complex society. Simple entertainment, too, has a value of its own. It lightens the burden of daily problems and it occupies men's leisure. The wide variety of productions that the media offer for these hours of leisure is in fact a remarkable service to mankind. But recipients should exercise self-control. They must not allow themselves to be so beguiled by the charms of the media's products or by the curiosity that these arouse that they neglect urgent duties or simply waste time." (Pope Paul VI)

"Playful actions themselves considered in their species are not directed to an end: but the pleasure derived from such actions is directed to the recreation and rest of the soul, and accordingly if this be done with moderation, it is lawful to make use of fun. Hence Tully says (De Officiis i,29): 'It is indeed lawful to make use of play and fun, but in the same way as we have recourse to sleep and other kinds of rest, then only when we have done our duty by grave and serious matters.'" (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"While some of the Stoics maintained that all pleasures are evil, the Epicureans held that pleasure is good in itself, and that consequently all pleasures are good. They seem to have thus erred through not discriminating between that which is good simply, and that which is good in respect of a particular individual. That which is good simply, is good in itself. Now that which is not good in itself, may be good in respect of some individual in two ways. In one way, because it is suitable to him by reason of a disposition in which he is now, which disposition, however, is not natural: thus it is sometimes good for a leper to eat things that are poisonous, which are not suitable simply to the human temperament. In another way, through something unsuitable being esteemed suitable. And since pleasure is the repose of the appetite in some good, if the appetite reposes in that which is good simply, the pleasure will be pleasure simply, and good simply. But if a man's appetite repose in that which is good, not simply, but in respect of that particular man, then his pleasure will not be pleasure simply, but a pleasure to him; neither will it be good simply, but in a certain respect, or an apparent good." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"As stated in Ethica Nicomachea x,2,3 some have maintained that all pleasure is evil. The reason seems to have been that they took account only of sensible and bodily pleasures which are more manifest; since, also in other respects, the ancient philosophers did not discriminate between the intelligible and the sensible, nor between intellect and sense (De Anima iii,3). And they held that all bodily pleasures should be reckoned as bad, and thus that man, being prone to immoderate pleasures, arrives at the mean of virtue by abstaining from pleasure. But they were wrong in holding this opinion. Because, since none can live without some sensible and bodily pleasure, if they who teach that all pleasures are evil, are found in the act of taking pleasure; men will be more inclined to pleasure by following the example of their works instead of listening to the doctrine of their words: since, in human actions and passions, wherein experience is of great weight, example moves more than words. We must therefore say that some pleasures are good, and that some are evil. For pleasure is a repose of the appetitive power in some loved good, and resulting from some operation; wherefore we assign a twofold reason for this assertion. The first is in respect of the good in which a man reposes with pleasure. For good and evil in the moral order depend on agreement or disagreement with reason... just as in the order of nature, a thing is said to be natural, if it agrees with nature, and unnatural, if it disagrees. Accordingly, just as in the natural order there is a certain natural repose, whereby a thing rests in that which agrees with its nature, for instance, when a heavy body rests down below; and again an unnatural repose, whereby a thing rests in that which disagrees with its nature, as when a heavy body rests up aloft: so, in the moral order, there is a good pleasure, whereby the higher or lower appetite rests in that which is in accord with reason; and an evil pleasure, whereby the appetite rests in that which is discordant from reason and the law of God." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

"Just as man needs bodily rest for the body's refreshment, because he cannot always be at work, since his power is finite and equal to a certain fixed amount of labor, so too is it with his soul, whose power is also finite and equal to a fixed amount of work. Consequently when he goes beyond his measure in a certain work, he is oppressed and becomes weary, and all the more since when the soul works, the body is at work likewise, in so far as the intellective soul employs forces that operate through bodily organs... Now just as weariness of the body is dispelled by resting the body, so weariness of the soul must needs be remedied by resting the soul: and the soul's rest is pleasure... Consequently, the remedy for weariness of soul must needs consist in the application of some pleasure, by slackening the tension of the reason's study. Thus in the Conferences of the Fathers xxiv,21, it is related of Blessed John the Evangelist, that when some people were scandalized on finding him playing together with his disciples, he is said to have told one of them who carried a bow to shoot an arrow. And when the latter had done this several times, he asked him whether he could do it indefinitely, and the man answered that if he continued doing it, the bow would break. Whence the Blessed John drew the inference that in like manner man's mind would break if its tension were never relaxed. Now such like words or deeds wherein nothing further is sought than the soul's delight, are called playful or humorous. Hence it is necessary at times to make use of them, in order to give rest, as it were, to the soul. This is in agreement with the statement of the Philosopher (Ethica Nicomachea iv,8) that 'in the intercourse of this life there is a kind of rest that is associated with games': and consequently it is sometimes necessary to make use of such things. Nevertheless it would seem that in this matter there are three points which require especial caution. The first and chief is that the pleasure in question should not be sought in indecent or injurious deeds or words. Wherefore Tully says (De Officiis i,29) that 'one kind of joke is discourteous, insolent, scandalous, obscene.' Another thing to be observed is that one lose not the balance of one's mind altogether. Hence Ambrose says (De Officiis ministorum i,20): 'We should beware lest, when we seek relaxation of mind, we destroy all that harmony which is the concord of good works': and Tully says (De Officiis i,29), that, 'just as we do not allow children to enjoy absolute freedom in their games, but only that which is consistent with good behavior, so our very fun should reflect something of an upright mind.' Thirdly, we must be careful, as in all other human actions, to conform ourselves to persons, time, and place, and take due account of other circumstances, so that our fun 'befit the hour and the man,' as Tully says (De Officiis i,29). Now these things are directed according to the rule of reason: and a habit that operates according to reason is virtue. Therefore there can be a virtue about games. The Philosopher gives it the name of wittiness [the Greek], and a man is said to be pleasant through having a happy turn of mind, whereby he gives his words and deeds a cheerful turn: and inasmuch as this virtue restrains a man from immoderate fun, it is comprised under modesty." (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

Also See: Excessive Play | Frivolous Amusement / Precept of Charity

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"Our soul is filled with the greatest grief when We see how the Christian people of today profane the afternoon of feast days; public places of amusement and public games are frequented in great numbers while the churches are not as full as they should be." (Pope Pius XII, "Mediator Dei", 1947)

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"Run from places of sin as from the plague." (St. John Climacus)

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"Travelers, whether their interest is international affairs, business, or leisure, should remember that they are itinerant heralds of Christ wherever they go and should act accordingly." (Second Vatican Council)

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

"Be not drawn after every enjoyment" (Sirach 37:28)

"Know then that we are the hired laborers. But as no man gives wages to a laborer, to the end he should do nothing save only to eat, so likewise we were not thereto called by Christ, that we should labor such things only as pertain to our own good, but to the glory of God. And like as the hired laborer looks first to his task, and after to his daily food, so ought we to mind first those things which concern the glory of God, then those which concern our own profit. Also as the hired laborer occupies the whole day in his Lord's work, and takes but a single hour for his own meal; so ought we to occupy our whole life in the glory of God, taking but a very small portion of it for the uses of this world." (St. John Chrysostom, Doctor of the Church)

"[P]lay is necessary for the intercourse of human life. Now whatever is useful to human intercourse may have a lawful employment ascribed to it. Wherefore the occupation of play-actors, the object of which is to cheer the heart of man, is not unlawful in itself; nor are they in a state of sin provided that their playing be moderated, namely that they use no unlawful words or deeds in order to amuse, and that they do not introduce play into undue matters and seasons. And although in human affairs, they have no other occupation in reference to other men, nevertheless in reference to themselves, and to God, they perform other actions both serious and virtuous, such as prayer and the moderation of their own passions and operations, while sometimes they give alms to the poor. Wherefore those who maintain them in moderation do not sin but act justly, by rewarding them for their services. On the other hand, if a man spends too much on such persons, or maintains those comedians who practice unlawful mirth, he sins as encouraging them in their sin. Hence [St.] Augustine says (Tractatus 100 in Joannis) that 'to give one's property to comedians is a great sin, not a virtue'; unless by chance some play-actor were in extreme need, in which case one would have to assist him, for [St.] Ambrose says (De Officiis ministorum; quoted in Canon Pasce, distintction 86): 'Feed him that dies of hunger; for whenever thou canst save a man by feeding him, if thou hast not fed him, thou hast slain him.'" (St. Thomas Aquinas, Doctor of the Church and "greatest theologian in the history of the Church")

Also See: The Entertainment & Communications Industries [Notable Catholics Section Reflections]

Note: Categories are subjective and may overlap. For more items related to this topic, please review all applicable categories. For more 'Reflections' and for Scripture topics, see links below.

Top | Reflections: A-Z | Catg. | Scripture: A-Z | Catg. | Help

[top]


Also Try...

Catholic Games (Topic Page)

Spiritual Growth (Topic Page)

Catholic Life (Reflections)

Increase Holiness (Reflections)

Catholic Events (Reflections)

Volunteers' Corner (Reflections)

Feed Your Faith (Reflections)

More Reflections: Alphabetical | Categorized

Topical Scripture: Alphabetical | Categorized

Teachings of Jesus 

Other New Testament Teachings 

Old Testament Wisdom

More Scripture / Parables

Communications / Entertainment (Classic Encyclicals)

More Classic Encyclicals

Daily Digest

Catholic Events

Volunteers' Corner

Feed Your Faith

Increase Holiness

Catholic Life

Can Catholic Dogma Ever Change?

Is the 1917 Code of Canon Law Still Applicable?

Didn't find what you were looking for? Try Here


Important Notice: Items herein are not comprehensive. Items herein are categorized subjectively and may overlap. We make no guarantees concerning any item herein. We may change punctuation, capitalization, shorten items, etc. and we caution that items herein may be out of context. We recommend reading items in full context in appropriate Catholic materials. Users are reminded that even saints and popes (when not speaking ex cathedra) are not infallible. Inclusion of any item does not necessarily imply our endorsement or agreement.  Consult appropriate, competent Church authorities for assistance in interpreting / applying items herein. Interpretation and application of items herein should not be contrary to the perennial, official teaching of the Roman Catholic Church. Do not take items out of context. Do not inflict harm on yourself or others, break laws, take unsuitable / incautious or inappropriate / drastic actions, or take figurative items literally. We are not responsible for any interpretation / misinterpretation, application / misapplication, use / misuse, etc. of any item. Use of site is at your own risk and is subject to our terms of use. Click here for more important terms/information


We make no guarantees regarding any item herein. By using this site you agree to all terms. For terms information, see "Important Notice" above and click here.

Help | Terms of UseOther FAQs

 

 

Also See...

* Catholic Games (Topic Page)

* Spiritual Growth (Topic Page)

* Inspirational Quotes (Topic Page)

* Classic Encyclicals / Papal Docs.

* Saints (Topic Page)

 

MCS Directory

(click here)

"Your Source For All Things Catholic!"

Click for Listings from 'Advertising' to 'Wholesalers'

List Your Catholic Product or Catholic Service FREE! Other listings just $24.95/yr.!+

List Your Business+

Sales & Specials

(click here)

'Click to Save on Catholic & Non-Catholic Products and Services'

Place Your Ad+

Catholic Community Center 

Completely Free!

Announcements

Answered Prayers

Catholic Basics

Catholic Book Review & Exchange

Catholic Events

Catholic Fun & Activities

Catholic Life

Catholic Links

Catholic News Links / Current Issues

Catholic Seniors

Church Talk

Coming Home

Feed Your Faith

Give & Take

Good News

Increase Holiness

Latin Mass & Catholic Tradition

Mary Our Mother

Non-Catholics

Notable Catholic Laity

Our Father's Love

Personal Stories of Inspiration

Prayer Requests

Prayers & Devotions

Priests & Vocations

Rosary

Sacraments

Saints

Scripture/Parables

Scripture Exchange

St. Francis Page for Pets

Vatican View

Volunteers' Corner

Why I Love Being Catholic

Support Your Community Center

'Pin it'

'Tweet This Site'

Notice: Clicking links above

leaves this site

More Information

Problem With Link?

Click to Support Quality Catholic Content - FREE!

Click for Vatican Gifts Starting Under $5.00

Our Pledge To Donors

What Your Donation Might Do

About Us

Classifieds

(click here)

Place Your Ad Today For Just $9.95!+

Announcements

Catholic Buddies

Catholic Organizations / Groups

Catholic Products

Catholic Services

Employment / Occupational

For Sale

Professional Services / Trades

Miscellaneous

Other Products

Other Services

Wanted

More...

 

 

   

 

 

 

Home

MCS Daily Digest

Quick Guide to This Site

What's New

Reception Desk

Notices

Coming Soon

Featured Sections

URL Shortcuts

Calendar

Goals / Purpose

This site is really free?

How can I add a "post" here?

Mission Statement

Privacy Statement

Imprimatur Information

Terms of Use

by using this site, you agree to all terms

MCS Directory

Community Center

Commercial Areas

Non-Catholics

About Us

FAQs

Tell a Friend

Invite a Business

Link to Us

My Catholic Source.com Blog & RSS Feed Info.

Third Party Programs

Awards

Feedback

Contact Us

This site powered by bfsnet.com

 Powered by bfsnet.com

Try Here For Great Catholic Apps!

Catholic Bible References (Click For More Information)

Catholic Bible References - Available on the App Store (click to download)

Catholic Bible References for Android - Available on Google Play (click to download)

Catholic Bible References for Android - Available at Amazon Appstore for Android (click to download)

iStations / Stations of the Cross (Click For More Information)

iStations - Available on the App Store (click to download)

iStations for Android - Available on Google Play (click to download)

iStations for Android - Available at Amazon Appstore for Android (click to download)

Saints4U (Click For More Information)

Saints4U - Available on the App Store (click to download)

Saints4U for Android - Available on Google Play (click to download)

Saints4U for Android - Available at Amazon Appstore for Android (click to download)

And Other Great Apps...

Speedy Dial! (Click For More Information)

Speedy Dial! - Available on the App Store (click to download)

Speedy Dial! for Android - Available on Google Play (click to download)

Speedy Dial! for Android - Available at Amazon Appstore for Android (click to download)

Just Checkin' In (Click For More Information)

Just Checkin' In - Available on the App Store (click to download)

Just Checkin' In for Android - Available on Google Play (click to download)

Just Checkin' In for Android - Available at Amazon Appstore for Android (click to download)

 

  


Click to shop at Amazon.com in support of MyCatholicSource.com

Click to shop at Amazon.com in support of MyCatholicSource.com [Click this image for Amazon Search - 'Catholic statues'] Click to shop at Amazon.com in support of MyCatholicSource.com [Click this image for Amazon Search - 'Catholic jewelry medals'] Click to shop at Amazon.com in support of MyCatholicSource.com [Click this image for Amazon Search - 'Crucifix'] Click to shop at Amazon.com in support of MyCatholicSource.com [Click this image for Amazon Search - 'Rosary beads'] Click to shop at Amazon.com in support of MyCatholicSource.com [Click this image for Amazon Search - 'Catholic artwork'] Click to shop at Amazon.com in support of MyCatholicSource.com

Notice: Clicking image/links above leaves this site. We do not recommend any website/product/service/seller/etc.

Reminder: Available items may differ from those pictured above.

More Information | Problem With Link?


iStations / Stations of the Cross (Click For More Information)       Catholic Bible References (Click For More Information)       Saints4U (Click For More Information)       Speedy Dial! (Click For More Information)       Just Checkin' In (Click For More Information)

Try Here For Great Catholic Apps!

Click For Android Versions


Please bookmark this site and visit often! 

| Home | Help | Quick Guide | Reception Desk | About Us | Terms of Use | Our MissionWhat's New |

| FAQs | Notices | MCS Calendar | MCS Daily Digest | Topic Pages | Featured Sections | Site Update |

| Check System Date/Time | URL Shortcuts | Question? | Code of Conduct | Privacy Statement |

| Section Info. | Your Posts | Timetables | Where to Post | Where to Find Posts | Submission Tips |

| Contribution Maximums | Support This Site | Tell a Friend | Invite a Business | Link to Us |

| Bookmark This Site | Guest BookDid You Know? | Site Benefits | Awards | Commercial Sections |

| MyCatholicSource.com Blog & RSS Feed Info. | Third Party Programs | Acknowledgements |

 | Search Site | Join Mailing List | Technical Assistance | Report Technical Problem |

| Post/User Problems | Contact Us | Feedback | Copyright Notice / Permissions |

| Make MyCatholicSource.com Your Default Home Page |

Thank you for being part of over 4,000,000 visitors to MyCatholicSource.com since 2009!  *

Click Here To Help Keep Us Online


Experiencing technical problems with this site? Please click "Report Technical Problem" link above

* Number of visits is based on raw, unfiltered access logs

+All ads subject to our terms. Price indicated may be base price for non-refundable processing fee, excluding tax, optional ad enhancements, etc. "Place your ad" / "list your business" / "list your Catholic product or service free" / etc. is not a guarantee that any ad will appear on this site. Payment of processing fee does not assure appearance of ad on site. References to target cycles (e.g. "just $##.##/yr.") are not guarantees [ads that appear on the site may appear for a longer or shorter time than the indicated target cycles (e.g. from 0 days to multiples of a target cycle)] and are subject to change at any time without notice (either retroactively or on a go-forward basis, either individually / selectively / grouped / or in total).

 

Reminders: You may not copy / distribute (including via e-mail, website, etc.) / sell / etc. information contained on this site (or any images) or use them for any commercial purpose whatsoever. All applicable content is owned by us and is protected by copyright laws. Any unauthorized reproduction / distribution / use of such content is prohibited by law and may result in severe civil and criminal penalties. Note that we reserve the right to prosecute violators to the maximum extent possible. Also note that views of others do not necessarily reflect our views. We make no guarantees regarding any item herein and we not responsible/liable for any consequences which may occur as a - direct or indirect - result of use of this site. By using this site (or associated materials), you agree to hold us harmless for all damages in connection with use of this site (or other materials), regardless of their nature. Remember that we are not a party to others' transactions / activities (including posting, browsing of posts/ads, transfers, contacts / correspondence, etc.) even if information regarding the transactions / activities appears on this site or other materials of ours, and that we do not mediate disputes. You are solely responsible for all consequences of your transactions / activities. Use of this site is at your own risk, with no liability whatsoever to us. By using this site, you agree to all terms. For more terms information, click here.

 

Copyright © 2001-2016, B.F.S. All rights reserved.

MyCatholicSource.com & BFSApps are divisions of B.F.S. | DR10.28.12 11:23:33 -0600LUP